Photography

10 Photographers you should ignore

I have been a Flickr user since 2007. Recently I admit to getting a little bored with it. Maybe there is a limit to image saturation, maybe because I am currently more engaged with my own work.

One of the good things that have come out of my time spent there is the discovery of LPV Magazine. An online and print magazine dedicated to contemporary documentary and fine art photography. LPV founder, Bryan Formhals has an entertaining article on wired.com which was originally published in 2010 on LPV.

Go read it.

 

 

 

Advertisement
Standard
Photography

At Night: Submission Rejects

I recently made a submission to SuperMassiveBlackhole Magazine for their upcoming At Night issue. My photos were based loosely around a theme of the unconscious. Result: Unsuccessful.

Disappointment sucks, but hopefully the ultimate outcome of this will be a positive learning experience.

Standard
Architecture, ghost estates, Photography

A sense of Place (Ghost Estates)

Some of the photos I have been posting here as part of my Ghost Estate (temporary title) series have perhaps been a little too descriptive. What I am trying to achieve with the photos is to convey a sense of place, an atmosphere, and to use the phrase again, something just beneath the surface.

There is a very fine line between descriptive and suggestive (if that is the right word). During a recent tutorial where I was showing a very loose edit of around 80 photos,  a fellow student suggested that there are opportunities for two projects in the collection: It all comes down to editing. I could choose a set of photos that are great, and descriptive, and have immediate visual impact. Or, I could choose a set using my intuition, my feelings, and perhaps take a few chances.

Standard
Architecture, ghost estates, Photography, photojournalism

Ghost Estates, Success Rates, and Taking Chances.

I am being reasonably conservative with my shooting – finances are tight – and if I were shooting digital I would probably shoot off at least a hundred frames per location. As it is I’m going through on average a roll (36 exposures) per location, depending on interesting features, lighting, time constraints, etc.

So far I have shot around ten rolls of film for the Ghost Estate photo project; thats around 360 photos. If I get three or four good shots per roll I’m reasonably happy.

That seems like a pretty low success rate, and maybe it is, perhaps I should be aiming higher. The problem with film is that each frame is a risk. Sometimes what you thought would be a great photo (at time of shooting) turns out to be mediocre. And sometimes you take a chance and hope for the best, and you might get lucky. What you see in front of you is not always what the camera sees.

Taking a good photo is relatively easy – with practice. Taking consistently good photos that reflect your true intentions is a totally different ball game. You win some, you lose some.

One, possibly two of the photos below might make the final edit.

Standard
Photography, photojournalism

April 1st deadline for our Rethink documentary photography project is fast approaching, and I have decided to present my final edit in a book format. So, lately I have been thinking about editing, sequencing, layouts, font types, spacing, spreads, and the limitations of photography.

I found this interesting video of Christopher Anderson talking about his book Capitolio. In it he explains some of his sequencing choices, and attempts to demistify the book editing process for a group of photography students.

You can view more about Capitolio here on the Magnum Photos website.

Link