Architecture, Ireland, Landscapes, Photography

Johnstown Castle, September 2012.

Johnstown Castle built between 1810 and 1855.

Inside the extensive walled garden.

A pretty long glasshouse.

 

A sea of steps leads up to the upper garden & old melon yard

Manmade landscape.

All of these images were made while testing the Sony NEX 7 mounted with Leica M glass on a Novoflex adapter. Lens used: 35mm Summicron, which effectively becomes a 50mm due to the 1.5 crop factor of the APS-C sensor.

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Architecture, Ireland, Landscapes, Photography

Traveling through Connemara

Once we passed passed through Galway, we inched our way deep into the heart of the Irish landscape that is Connemara: Rolling hills, spectacular mountains, bogs, sheep, and traditional architecture. All breathtaking. The journey to our destination took twice what it should due to multiple stops; jumping out of the car to compose, focus, and click, pause for a moment to be totally awed, then back into the car and on the road again. The kids weren’t impressed with our behavior, but understandably they were tired after a six hour car journey.

Romantic notions of the Irish countryside

Currachs moored in a small harbour.

Our trusty steed in the foreground!

An old schoolhouse typical of rural Ireland.

On the road with Croagh Patrick in the distance.

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media, Photography, photojournalism

A Lasting Toll: Short Film by Katie Falkenberg

Katie Falkenberg’s, A Lasting Toll is a well made, effective, short multimedia piece that explores the lives of three american families struggling to come to terms with the recession.

 

 

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Ireland, Landscapes, Vernacular architecture

Visiting Clare Island

Two months has passed since visiting Clare Island in the west of Ireland: It seems like years. I first visited the island thirty years ago. My memories are vague, but I remember spending the night there after my great uncle – an island resident, and lighthouse keeper – insisted we spend the night.

Looking back to the mainland as we head towards the Island; the scenery was spectacular.

Local Architecture; new and old. If walls could talk!

Home, sweet (temporary) home. One thing I really loved about Clare Island was the fact that there were no manicured lawns anywhere. The small areas of land that were not in use for sheep grazing or agriculture were used to grow vegetables and herbs by, and for, the residents.

The younger kids didn’t appreciate the 3km walk we made – on more than one occasion – daily.

Amazing scenery: Original potato drills from the famine era are still visible.

The impressive Croagh Patrick across Clew Bay in the distance. 

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Traditional Currachs used for fishing in Clew Bay.

A few days before our arrival, a local man lost his life while using a currach similar to those in the photo. It was the first drowning on the island in 90 years, and the atmosphere was very solemn. The water was pretty choppy for August; I can only imagine how rough it gets during the stormy winter months.

We spent one full day on the beach – from low tide to high tide. It was possibly the best day we had all summer; 25C degrees, blue skies, no wind, and crystal clear waters. I swam more that day than I did during June and July.

Our point of departure/arrival on the mainland, with Clare Island’s distinct profile in the background.

I can’t wait to go back to Clare Island – ideally I would like to spend a full year there to experience the four seasons, and immerse myself in the islanders life. Until then, Clare Island, you remain in my thought and dreams.

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